Jurors: Anita Fields and Basil Kincaid

Anita Fields is a Native American artist from the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Although her artistic career began later in her life, Fields is nationally recognized for her unique rendering of cultural items in clay. Fields specializes in ceramics, non-functional earthenware, and traditional Osage ribbon work. Some of the museums that have collected Fields' work include The Heard Museum, the Cowboy and Western Heritage Center, and the Museum of Art and Design. Her work has also been included in exhibitions such as the National Museum of the American Indian at the Smithsonian titled "Who Stole the Tepee," and the "Legacy of the Generations: American Indian Women Potters" at the National Museum of Women in the Arts.

Basil Kincaid is a renown African American Visual Artist and activist from St. Louis. His artwork addresses concepts of identity, place, race and environmentalism, with a focus on issues facing the poor and people of color. He seeks to a shine light on these communities by bringing attention to abandoned spaces, decaying neighborhoods, and the people that live in them. His work is site-specific and comprised of found, discarded, or donated materials with relevance to the place of cultivation. This methodology is an investigation of how waste is a reflection of lived experience.

in the curated gallery


Chelsea Ritter-Soronen - "Epoch: Refugee Crisis," Chelsea's exhibition is a 12-foot hand-illustrated mural by public artist, she reflects upon the stories shared with her from Syrian citizens displaced by war. With the goal of raising awareness of a global critical conversation, the visuals are a chronological depiction of several refugees' arduous journeys, from pre-war to asylum, to a seemingly infinite wait for what comes next.

The St. Louis Artists' Guild presents Displacement and Migration, a national juried exhibition that investigates the current or historically forced or voluntary relocation of individuals or groups of people who no longer inhabit their place of origin. Jurors, Anita Fields and Basil Kincaid selected 49 artists with work exploring the complexities of this theme today and throughout history from a personal perspective. This exhibition featured artworks and educational programming in conversation with slavery, apartheid, war, homelessness, and diaspora motivated by culture, politics, religion, and climate. The awards presentation led by local artist Basil Kincaid gave cash prizes totaling $1000.

Selected Artists: Azra Aksamija, Maryamsadat Amirvaghefi, Sally Coffin, Elizabeth Concannon, Maritza Davila, Elizabeth Desrosiers, Robert Dill, Barbara DiMartini, Daniel Drennan Elawar, Mitchell Eismont, Hale Ekinci, Robert Fields, Amy Firestone Rosen, Katherine Freeman, Maria Paz Gajardo, Eloisa Guanlao, Robin Hattori, Mary Henle, Candace Hunter, Neil Kruel, Albert Kuo, Gary Lehman, Pamela Lin, Julia Lopez, Jennifer Mannebach, Bobby Marines, Nathan Marshall, Luisa Otero, Katherine Palmer, Simonette Quamina, Bob Rickert, Jini Sachse, Whitney Sage, Sabina Schaaf, Rebecca Schaffer, Debra Smith, Linda Smith, Joanne Stremsterfer, Torri Thompson, Wendy Tigchelaar, Siavash Tohidi, Joyce Trotter, Patricia Turner, Eden Unluata, Jeane Vogel, Ani Volkan, Linda Wright, Layala Zubi, Adam Zuwala